STILL OPTIMIST – Album Review: “Velvet Season”

Mysterious. Captivating. Sensuous. Moody. Gorgeous. All words that describe my impressions when listening to the brilliant debut album Velvet Season by the experimental band Still Optimist. Formed in Paris, France in 2017 by Ukrainian artist Bina Timurova (vocals, songwriting, composing, guitar), and Hungarian Mihaly Sipos (keyboards, synthesisers, electronics, programming), Still Optimist creates an arresting blend of electronic/ trip-hop/ ambient/ cinematic music. In their bio, they colorfully describe their major influences: alternative and electronic music bands such as The Cure with its contradictory ambivalent of joy and sorrow; Massive Attack with their dark bass lines and atmospheric synth pads; Bjork and her multi-layered meaningful lyrics and the way she moves with her voice on an extreme scale; Tesla Boy with the whole 80’s synth pop vibe and tunes;  The Chemical Brothers for their outstanding soundscape and constant motion in sounds, and many more, such as Phantogram, Atoms for Peace, Him, Depeche Mode, Underworld, FSOL, and Archive.”

Another strong influence for the duo in the creation of Velvet Season was the 2013 Jim Jarmusch vampire film Only Lovers Left Alive. They state: “The slow, dark melancholy, the constant whispering presence of passion and crunchy guitar tunes somehow beautifully lifted, transformed into a fully coherent album.” But whatever their influences, what’s clear is that their songwriting is exceptional, with intriguing lyrics, complex and unusual melodic structures, and innovative musical techniques.

This is immediately apparent on the opening track “Another Space,” which starts off with mysterious industrial sounding synths, a sharp drumbeat and buzzing reverb. Bina’s unusual vocals are baby-like, yet sultry as she sings “I am raising my eyes to the sky. But I’ll never see all the stars in the space. That one day are destined to meet. And their beautiful light, like a beacon for lost ships, will be mixed in a fatal dance. And those stars are destined to meet.” The tempo then shifts to a strong hypnotic EDM beat, as the industrial synths and heavy buzzing reverb continue. Bina croons “And they will be absorbed in their final farewell ball. They could even collapse, giving birth to a Black Hole.” It’s a mesmerizing track.

The creative visuals and design are also an important aspect of their production, as evidenced in their videos like this one:

Next up is the trippy “Dark Places,” with it’s spooky soundscape of grinding psychedelic synths and sensuous keyboards. Bina’s vocal gymnastics are impressive, reminding me at times of Phantogram’s Sarah Barthel. “Voices” has a Depeche Mode vibe, with lush synths that are mysterious and fuzzy.  Bina’s vocals are enthralling as she sings about her fantasies and desires becoming a reality:  “And these voices around my head they are getting louder. Voices around my head they remind me I like it.”

Here Comes the Sun” is a beautiful triphop song about how natural forces always triumph over humans’ attempt to subjugate them: “Plants overgrown on blocks, drain the strength of concrete, take them into possession.  People are full of absurd in their paltry attempts to transcend over Nature.” This becomes a metaphor for a loved one’s irrepressible nature: “Green sprouts grow through cracks in grey stone. As did your lust for life through all my years.” Bina’s soaring vocals are sublime.

Chance” opens with a bit of surf guitar riff and strong drumbeat, then glittery synths and what sounds like skittering snare drum are layered over the repetitive drumbeat. With breathy vocals, Bina sings “If I only had a chance to feel your presence next to me. It’s more than I could give or take, that’s something that I can’t admit.” Heavy, distorted reverb and psychedelic synths are dominant features of the mysterious “Free Fall.” Bina passionately implores: “Don’t ask me why I’m afraid ’cause I won’t give you the right answer. When you jump out of a plane in free fall there’s no button to cancel.”

Nomad” appropriately has a Middle Eastern feel with a beguiling melody and richly exotic synths that evoke the mystery of the fabled Arabian Nights.  Bina’s sensuously breathy vocals are alluring as she sings to one about not being afraid to embrace their final moments of life: “Tell me all if you can about sorrows in your heart, things that you regret. Spell things out if you can. That you had in life, that you won’t forget. Don’t be afraid of nomad, I won’t hurt you bad. In your place some people would be glad. Don’t be afraid, my virtue, I won’t steal from you. I’m here for one thing that I owed you. Cause I’m your death.

One of my favorites is the dark and haunting title track “Velvet Season.” The song opens with a foreboding piano riff and Bina softly singing. The music and her vocals gradually become more dramatic, conveying a sense of impending danger as the song grows more ominous. The keyboards and other synths are really fantastic. The song lyrics seem to be spoken to the vampire who’s kiss – i.e. bite – has forever changed her existence: “I know that you won’t feel the swelling that sucks the life out of me. / I already miss you, your kiss on my neck. We both know it clearly, there is no way back. / You ask me if I’m scared, yes I’m scared to close my eyes when I’m in bed. I’ll tell you, honey; there’s always a little reason to extend a bit my Velvet Season.” “With You” is a fine triphop song with grainy, otherworldly synths that impart a decidedly psychedelic vibe.

The album closes on a bittersweet note with the hauntingly beautiful “My Shoes.” The complex, layered synths on this track are exquisite, and accompanied by some wonderful guitar work. Bina’s heartfelt vocals are gorgeous, fervently expressing deep sorrow and regret over past sins and transgressions: “There is a time that I want to forget. For the peace of my mind. And if I just could I would erase it all, those horrible things. / Guess, my shoes didn’t fit you. My shoes didn’t fit you as they’re full of broken glass inside. Cause my traumas are full of crime.”

Velvet Season is a truly impressive debut for Still Optimist. Their captivating melodies, outstanding songwriting, and Mihaly’s creative and skillful use of synthesizers, makes for incredible and deeply compelling music. Toss in Bina’s amazing vocal abilities, and the result is a brilliant work of musical art. This is an album that can, and should, be listened to repeatedly, as the complexity of the compositions always offer up new discoveries.

To learn more about Still Optimist, check out their website
Follow them on Facebook / TwitterInstagram

Stream or purchase their music on YouTube / Spotify / Soundcloud / Google PlayApple Music / Bandcamp

Top 30 Songs for July 1-7, 2018

 

1. I FEEL LIKE I’M DROWNING – Two Feet (2)
2. BAD BAD NEWS – Leon Bridges (1)
3. ZOMBIE – Bad Wolves (4)
4. HUNGER – Florence + the Machine (8)
5. PINK LEMONADE – James Bay (3)
6. THOUGHT CONTAGION – Muse (5)
7. CELEBRATE – Dirty Heads, The Unlikely Candidates (7)
8. SAY AMEN (SATURDAY NIGHT) – Panic! At the Disco (12)
9. THIS IS AMERICA – Childish Gambino (6)
10. UNWIND – John Defeo (14)
11. BROKEN – lovelytheband (11)
12. FOUR OUT OF FIVE – Arctic Monkeys (15)
13. HANDYMAN – AWOLNATION (9)
14. &RUN – Sir Sly (10)
15. I HOPE YOU’RE HAPPY – Blue October (13)
16. COLORS – Beck (16)
17. LIFE TO FIX – The Record Company (19)
18. WHATEVER IT TAKES – Imagine Dragons (17)
19. RED MOON SKY – Face of Stone (21)
20. 44 – Oli Barton & the Movement (23)
21. QUARTER PAST MIDNIGHT – Bastille (22)
22. FRACTURED NATION – Future Theory (24)
23. DEVIL – Shinedown (18)
24. HI HELLO – Johnny Marr (27)
25. KAMIKAZE – WALK THE MOON (28)
26. SIT NEXT TO ME – Foster the People (25) 38th week on list
27. SILVER LINING – Mt. Joy (20)
28. BLOOM – Troye Sivan (29)
29. SUCH A SIMPLE THING – Ray LaMontagne (N)
30. GIVE YOURSELF A TRY – The 1975 (N)

TEISAN – Single Review: “Anchor Pt 2”

Teisan2

Teisan is an exceptionally talented and prolific young singer/songwriter from Mannheim, Germany who I learned about when he followed me on Instagram. He started playing guitar at the age of 14, and quickly began writing songs in a predominantly ambient acoustic style. His songs tend toward a more introspective side, with heartfelt, personal lyrics. In his bio, he states “I like to make music about things I experienced in my life. What I write down in the lyrics helps me in dealing with past events.” In early 2016, when he was only 17, he released an excellent debut album Different Point of View. He followed up with an equally impressive second album Impatience in October 2017, and I strongly encourage my readers to check them both out.

Teisan has been writing and recording new songs for his forthcoming third album From Ten Thousand Miles Under the Ocean, and recently dropped a new single “Anchor Pt. 2,” which will be featured on that album. The song is a second part to “Anchor,” one of the tracks on Different Point of View. “Anchor” is a bittersweet song with simple lyrics that speak to a loved one who’s letting her fears of the unknown drag her down, the anchor representing those fears. On “Anchor Pt. 2” he’s come to the realization that she’s now dragging him down too:

I write a song, rip out my heart
You didn’t care and laughed
That’s the reason we’re apart
You think gossip makes you smarter
Heavy on my shoulders, I couldn’t swim to the surface
But time made me bolder
Ain’t the one that I need
You’re the anchor bound to my feet

Musically, the track is built around a wistful but pleasing acoustic guitar riff. Delicate, airy synths are layered over the riff, along with sounds of snapping fingers, gentle percussion and added subtle guitar chords to create a serene and beautiful soundscape. Teisan has a smooth, lovely voice, and sings with an earnest vulnerability that’s calm yet quite touching. It’s a wonderful song.

Connect with Teisan:  Facebook / Instagram
Check out more of his songs on his YouTube channel and on Bandcamp

INFECTED SUN – Mini EP Review: “Summer Nights”

Infected Sun, aka Justin Stephens, is a prolific DJ/producer of electronic House music based in Ipswich, UK. He covers a wide range of styles, including Deep House, Chill House, Chill Step, Trap, Trip Hop and Lounge, though his preferred style is Deep House. He only started producing music in early 2016, but is already signed to two labels – Blue Coffee Records and GM Records. And during that little more than two-year time period, he’s produced an impressive output of music, both as a solo artist and in collaboration with other talented artists, including Samantha, Melissa Marks, CocoaRed, Justin Kayser, Rachel Leach, Justinas Stanislovaitis and Vizualye, among others. One of his latest releases is the Mini EP Summer Nights, featuring two stellar Deep House tracks “Warm Summer Nights” and “House Jacking.”

Infected Sun pic

Now I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t fully understand the defining characteristics and nuances of the various types of House music. I know some of it has to do with the number of beats per minute (bpm), number and/or speed of breakdowns, and how different instrument sounds such as bass, keys or drums are utilized and emphasized. But I pretty much like them all, as long as the songs move me in some way. If the melodies are compelling, the beats interesting, and the music pleasing and/or exciting, I’m happy. And that feeling applies to virtually every Infected Sun track I’ve heard – and I’ve listened to more than 25 of them!

The two tracks on Summer Nights certainly meet all my criteria for what constitutes good House music. “Warm Summer Nights” lives up to its title, with sultry synths and a groovy bassline set to a sensual, hypnotic drum machine loop. The sparkling keys and airy synths that enter halfway through are sublime, making for a gorgeous soundscape that evokes a night filled with the promise of passion. It’s a stunning track.

“House Jacking” has a bit of a tech-house vibe, with a slightly faster bpm. Once again, Infected Sun employs a drum machine loop to create an immersive dance beat, accompanied by smooth synths that continue throughout the track. This time around, though, he uses a plucked bass sound to drive the song forward. Along with the delicate, rather psychedelic organ synths, they’re the dominant features of this superb track.

Infected Sun also hosts the Friday Night House Sessions, a two-hour Deep House show he runs every two weeks on Facebook Live at 7:30 pm GMT. He’s often joined by other special guest DJs like DJ JerryS and DJ Embrace. It’s an enjoyable show, so check it out if you’re into House music.

Connect with Infected Sun:  Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Stream his music:  Spotify / Soundcloud / Beatport
Purchase on  iTunes / junodownload

Top 30 Songs for June 24-30, 2018

1. BAD BAD NEWS – Leon Bridges (1)
2. I FEEL LIKE I’M DROWNING – Two Feet (2)
3. PINK LEMONADE – James Bay (3)
4. ZOMBIE – Bad Wolves (5)
5. THOUGHT CONTAGION – Muse (6)
6. THIS IS AMERICA – Childish Gambino (4)
7. CELEBRATE – Dirty Heads, Unlikely Candidates (9)
8. HUNGER – Florence + the Machine (11)
9. HANDYMAN – AWOLNATION (7)
10. &RUN – Sir Sly (8)
11. BROKEN – lovelytheband (10)
12. SAY AMEN (SATURDAY NIGHT) – Panic! At the Disco (12)
13. I HOPE YOU’RE HAPPY – Blue October (14)
14. UNWIND – John Defeo (15)
15. FOUR OUT OF FIVE – Arctic Monkeys (17)
16. COLORS – Beck (18)
17. WHATEVER IT TAKES – Imagine Dragons (13)
18. DEVIL – Shinedown (16)
19. LIFE TO FIX – The Record Company (20)
20. SILVER LINING – Mt. Joy (19)
21. RED MOON SKY – Face of Stone (23)
22. QUARTER PAST MIDNIGHT – Bastille (24)
23. 44 – Oli Barton & the Movement (25)
24. FRACTURED NATION – Future Theory (26)
25. SIT NEXT TO ME – Foster the People (22) 37th week on list
26. FAVORITE COLOR IS BLUE – Robert DeLong, K.Flay (21)
27. HI HELLO – Johnny Marr (N)
28. KAMIKAZE – WALK THE MOON (29)
29. BLOOM – Troye Sivan (30)
30. DANGEROUS NIGHT – 30 Seconds to Mars (28)

CuriousHour – EP Review: “Explore”

Curious Hour ep

If you like soulful, blues-soaked rock accompanied by raw, passionate female vocals, then you should be listening to the music of UK band  CuriousHour. Formed two years ago, the London-based four-piece consists of guitarist Andy Grazebrook, vocalist Emily Grazebrook, drummer Wal Srankiewicz and bassist Aaron McIntosh. In July, 2017 they released their superb debut EP Explore, which I have the pleasure of reviewing today.

The first track “Lailah” arrives on sound waves of fuzzy guitars, strutting drums and a humming bass line. Then, Emily’s rich, bluesy vocals enter the scene and within seconds I’m blown away. Wow, what a voice she has! The kind of voice that demands your attention. She seems to channel the raw soulfulness of Tina Turner, the bluesy feels of Amy Winehouse, and the unrestrained passion of Janis Joplin. On “Lailah,” a palpable sense of tension and uncertainty simmers beneath the seeming coolness of her voice, occasionally piercing the surface as she croons about not knowing which direction to take: “Solo, solo, solo. Walking, walking walking. Don’t know, don’t know which way to go.” As the track progresses, Andy lays down some nimble guitar work, while Aaron gently strums his bass. It’s a great song.

The next track “Yield” is positively sublime. The guys are in perfect sync on their respective instruments, and Emily raises goosebumps as she fervently wails the lyrics expressing the depths of her hunger for another’s love: “I would do anything if you only lay your hands on me. / I’d cause a tidal wave to charge, wipe out all of humanity. Send them streaming from the land. Swallow them up into the sea. So that I could be with you. Oh I would give you the world if you’d love me.”

One of the things that strikes me as I listen to the EP is how beautifully each track flows into the next, sustaining the spell that CuriousHour have cast upon our ears, minds and souls. At times their bluesy sound reminds me a bit of Jefferson Airplane and Big Brother & the Holding Company. “Geraldine” is mesmerizing, and once again, Emily’s vocals are breathtaking. And no more so than on “Wanted,” where her jaw-dropping vocal gymnastics are on full display. She alternately seduces, snarls and wails the lyrics that speak to a detestable scoundrel: “You’re so quick on the draw, even your horse hates ya. Price on my head. Don’t stop til I’m dead. / You’re above the law but even your momma hates ya. How much to walk away?” The guitars, bass and drums on this epic track are all pretty amazing too.

The band dials up the energy on “Dark Surf,” a rousing rock’n’roll song with awesome fuzzy guitar work and thunderous drumming that make for an exciting listen. Two thirds in, the tempo slows to a languid, bluesy lull in the bridge, before ramping back up to full speed for an exhilarating finish. Emily’s refrain of “rise and fall” is an apt description of the song.

Explore is a wonderful EP that gets better with every listen, and every track is fantastic. There’s a lot of nuance in Andy’s intricate guitar work, Aaron’s subtle bass and Wal’s expert drumming, and each time I was able to detect something new I’d missed previously. Then there’s Emily’s mind-blowing vocals, which I could never tire of hearing.

CuriousHour have been gigging regularly ever since their inception, spreading their noise around London, the south of England and around the UK with plans to play in Europe. In the meantime, those of you in the UK can catch them at one of these upcoming shows:

JULY 11 7:30 & 10:30 PM  CURIOUSHOUR @ THE DUBLIN CASTLE

AUG 25 7:00 PM  NESTIVAL, The Birds Nest, London

Connect with CuriousHour:  Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Stream their music:  Spotify / Apple Music / Soundcloud
Purchase:  iTunes / Bandcamp

Interview with UK Musician David Oakes

David Oakes

David Oakes is a fine (he hates when I say ‘talented’) musician and composer of electronic alternative rock music based in Wales, UK. In the early 2000’s, he was drummer with the British rock band Kotow, and since 2012 he’s produced a tremendous output of instrumental music as a solo artist, ranging from gentle synth-driven compositions to aggressive guitar-driven hard rock, and everything in between. In early May, he released his latest album TheMENACE, which I reviewed and you can read here. It’s a brilliant work that’s actually a double album, with the first containing 11 tracks, most with vocals, and the second being an instrumental-only version, plus two bonus tracks not found on the first.

I recently had a chat with David about his music background, influences and creative process.

1. Hello David. Thank you for wanting to talk with me about your music. You and I have spoken a bit in the past about your background, but for the sake of our readers, let’s touch on that again. You now live in Wales, but were born in England, then spent part of your childhood and early teen years in the Middle East. Living in Dubai must have been interesting, or at least an unusual experience I would think. What positive or negative things did you come away with?

Yes! I moved there when I was two so obviously I don’t remember relocating there. I remember a couple of the houses we lived in – mostly the 3rd one which is very strong in my memory. I can recall it in detail. We lived very near the sea and would go camping in the desert at the weekend. I had a little 50cc PW50 motorcycle that I drove everywhere :). It took me a very very long time to get over moving to the UK.

2.  Why is that?

Hot 365 and living by the beach, etc. to … Wales… Camping in the desert at the weekend, dune bashing to … oh, nothing.

3. At what age did you start playing guitar, or other instruments? I remember you saying you attended a music institute in England after you moved back there with your family. What did you study there?

We had an electric piano in the house from around 1988 and I taught myself stuff on that. Eventually I got my own keyboard and I was off. I played it every day and wrote my own albums onto cassettes. I don’t have any of them anymore. They wouldn’t have sounded very professional. I even bought card from the newsagent and printed out artwork onto them and chopped them into cassette sleeve size. You can see the lineage all the way back . The only difference to what I do now is I don’t print out my own artwork. Everything else is the same – the tech has just improved. I went to ACM (Academy of Contemporary Music) in Guildford in 2009 for 3 years to study guitar and music theory. I passed all my exams but I never attempted my dissertation so I never got the qualification.

4. You formed a rock band called Kotow with your brother and another friend, and released a pretty decent album “Demise of the Monsters.” How or why did you guys choose that band name, and how long was Kotow an active band? 

Rich wanted a Japanese name and so looked in a Japanese dictionary and found “Kotow” meaning to bow or acquiesce… We all liked the name. We formed around February 2002, whilst I was going back and forth to the city (Cardiff) to study music production on a “New Deal” course under the Labour Gov which lasted from 1997 until around 2004. Anyway – since Dad had re-married – they moved out of the house and the whole band lived in our big farmhouse so we could write and rehearse all day every day. After moving to the London area in 2004 or so, we realised that nobody really cared and got fed up with it and we split in 2006. 

5. I believe you played drums for Kotow. Tell me about your experiences playing in a band – both good and bad if you care to go there. Why did the band eventually split up?

You know me, I have no ego but I did believe we were the best band in south Wales. When we moved to London, nobody gave us the time of day and we all got tired of it. Plus I wasn’t happy with the direction our music was taking. My main thing was to write catchy riffs in odd time signatures and do my best to come up with complimentary drum parts. I’d get annoyed if I couldn’t play for the song and could only think of something ordinary. We liked being unconventional. We lost two guitarists for one reason or another and we got a new guy who was great, but he and Rich wanted us to sound more like the tech bands at the time and I really wanted to stick to our original ethos of being unlike anyone else. Oh well.

6. You obviously wanted to continue making music after Kotow ended. I know some of your favourite bands are Dream Theater, Mastodon, Green Day and Metallica, so am guessing your sound is greatly influenced by their music? 

I expect so. Not directly or deliberately. I just write music and what comes out, comes out. Exactly the same process as Kotow. I like making albums of different genres and styles since I listen to a lot of different genres and styles. I couldn’t imagine being in one of those metal bands who sound exactly like everyone else and only listen to that music. Boring.

7. When did you record your first solo album?

“The Juggernaut” in 2012. It was originally supposed to be the follow up to “Demise Of The Monsters” and Rich would play bass and sing and I’d produce since he’d done almost all the work on DOTM. I merely played guitar on that album. Since I’d never attempted a “proper” professional sounding album before and had only limited experience with Logic – I worked on it every day for about 6 – 8 months. I still enjoy it to this day but I think I’ve done better and I learn something new with each album I do.

8. You’ve been fairly prolific, recording and releasing quite a few albums and compilations over the past few years, several of which I’ve purchased. What inspires you to create a new album with a specific theme and sound?

I don’t like to create the same album twice in a row…So if I do a hard rock album I definitely won’t do one again as it kinda wears me out when working on an album. “Transmissions” was songs I wrote when I was learning guitar and some of those songs had been fully formed in my head for many many years until I could finally record them properly. “Transmission Part 1 & 2” was completely written and I had it all worked out in my head and even recorded a version of it way back in 1997 or so on my Dad’s 2-track reel-to-reel machine.

Every time I start an album I have to come up with something great first. That’s the springboard. If I like an idea – that’ll be the blueprint for the album. I could never just write 8 -10 random songs and that’ll do. None of my albums are fully fledged concept albums but I try to imagine they are. . . As I’ve said in the past – I like albums to sound/feel like *albums* and not just Here’s 10 tracks I wrote in any order…

Even if the idea doesn’t end up lasting the whole album – the initial idea is usually enough impetus. With “Strum Und Drang” I’d been listening to the 21st Anniversary of Leftfield’s “Leftism” pretty much on repeat and wanted to do something inspired by that. I pretty much listened to nothing but Leftfield’s three albums for the summer of 2017 and wrote at the same time. “The Menace” seemed to be the next logical step.

9. Your latest effort “The Menace” is one of your finest. Some of your previous works contained a few dark tracks, but most of the songs were more melodic, almost orchestral rock like that of Dream Theater. Also, for the first time you added lyrics and vocals. You told me it’s a loose concept album, and that you kept the lyrics intentionally vague, but what was your inspiration behind “The Menace” and it’s dark theme? Also, what made you decide to add a vocal component?

Thank You. I had so much fun making “Sturm Und Drang” that I wanted to do another in that style but – as I said at the time – I wanted it “tougher and harder sounding.“ One of the few times that the album has pretty much turned out exactly how I envisioned from the beginning. Once I had “ The Slammer “ – I knew I was onto something. Loose concept album in that…I didn’t intentionally write lyrics to mean anything – I just had my microphone there – played the track and improvised some stuff until I found something I liked.

After a while I realised all the improvs could be about a few things. Notably the “MeToo” movement, #45… all of these things that were going on in the news at the time. Completely subconsciously. Only the final two tracks “Finale Part I and II” I wrote to tie up this theme. All other lyrics are improvised. And yeah I kept it intentionally vague as I’ve never wanted to align myself with any party or politics or anything and I was not a fan of Kotow’s Anti-President Bush EP. I never wanted to be a political band – one of the other factors that led to our break up. As for vocals – people kept pestering me to include them and I thought if I do it, I’m gonna distort the crap out of them… Which I did on “The Slammer”. But as the album went on, I got more confident and I turned the distortion further and further down. I think I’ll do vocals again should I do another album at some point… Probably same style too.

10.  Besides my glowing review, what has been the response to The Menace?

Thank you! Well – same as ever. A few RTs from music accounts and a few more people saying they like it but nothing amazing really. About the same as it was for “Sturm Und Drang” or “The Dawn And The Dusk.” *shrug*

11. That leads me to the next question. You and I have shared our own frustrations over the lack of support from a majority of our so-called ‘followers’ on social media, who rarely if ever engage with our tweets, postings, etc. But in today’s music industry, an artist or band (or just about any other creative person) is all but forced to use social media to get people to learn about their music, unless they’re willing or able to hire an expensive publicist. Any thoughts about this?

Interesting subject since my degree course dissertation was basically gonna be all about this. “Do we need big recording studios now that people are making pro albums in their bedrooms“ etc etc… I THINK that the Internet has ruined a lot of music. Shops are closing because people are buying everything online, and it’s so hard to stand out when everyone and their dog has a band and a Bandcamp and a Soundcloud. It’s like whispering in a hurricane… And I’m not smart enough to think of some cool promo gimmick. And whenever I think I have something, it never works so…

12. Do you have any plans for a future album, or will you take a long break?

Ya know it speaks for itself – when I was putting out albums every month that I’d recorded in a week – the quality was dipping. You know how I feel about “Imaginary film soundtrack .“ I was so disappointed with it, I actually paid to have it taken down. I know I rushed it and it shows. I still cannot listen to it. Starting with “Juggernaut III” and then continuing with “Sturm Und Drang” and now “The Menace,” I’ve taken my time to craft an album over many months. Take a break..come back…listen to it….fix/adjust anything…etc. And as a result, those three albums I mentioned have a little extra going for them. I’m actually a huge fan of “The Dawn & The Dusk”. Its one of my favourite things I’ve done. And I seem to remember taking my time with that one too so… “The Menace” is still very fresh to me. It was released on May 4 – eight months after “Sturm Und Drang.” I’m not even thinking about another album and probably won’t until winter. I mentioned to someone once that i’d like to take a year to release an album at some point. Maybe I will for the next one. It won’t be a double though. I’d like to get down to doing only one album a year.

13. Anything else you’d like to share that I’ve neglected to ask?

I think that the “Sturm Und Drang” and “The Menace” “style” will be my default setting from now on. They were both really fun to create and I actually plan on buying a midi keyboard to make composing a lot easier.

I know James Lauters (a very supportive mutual friend of David’s and mine) likes the what I call the X&Y series. And I may do another one eventually but it would have to be really chilled out. Like “Dawn And The Dusk” but even more chilled. Lots more acoustic. Basically the exact opposite of “The Menace.”

Cheers !

Enjoy this guitar play-through by David of “The Monster,” one of many great tracks from The Menace.

Stream his music on Spotify / Apple Music / Soundcloud
Purchase on  iTunes

Top 30 Songs for June 17-23, 2018

1. BAD BAD NEWS – Leon Bridges (1)
2. I FEEL LIKE I’M DROWNING – Two Feet (4)
3. PINK LEMONADE – James Bay (2)
4. THIS IS AMERICA – Childish Gambino (3)
5. ZOMBIE – Bad Wolves (7)
6. THOUGHT CONTAGION – Muse (8)
7. HANDYMAN – AWOLNATION (5)
8. &RUN – Sir Sly (6)
9. CELEBRATE – Dirty Heads, Unlikely Candidates (10)
10. BROKEN – lovelytheband (9)
11. HUNGER – Florence + the Machine (14)
12. SAY AMEN (SATURDAY NIGHT) – Panic! At the Disco (13)
13. WHATEVER IT TAKES – Imagine Dragons (11)
14. I HOPE YOU’RE HAPPY – Blue October (15)
15. UNWIND – John Defeo (16)
16. DEVIL – Shinedown (12)
17. FOUR OUT OF FIVE – Arctic Monkeys (19)
18. COLORS – Beck (18)
19. SILVER LINING – Mt. Joy (20)
20. LIFE TO FIX – The Record Company (21)
21. FAVORITE COLOR IS BLUE – Robert DeLong, K.Flay (17)
22. SIT NEXT TO ME – Foster the People (23)
23. RED MOON SKY – Face of Stone (24)
24. QUARTER PAST MIDNIGHT – Bastille (25)
25. 44 – Oli Barton & the Movement (27)
26. FRACTURED NATION – Future Theory (28)
27. GUIDE YOU IN THE DARK – RECKLESS JACKS (22)
28. DANGEROUS NIGHT – 30 Seconds to Mars (N)
29. KAMIKAZE – WALK THE MOON (N)
30. BLOOM – Troye Sivan (N)

NO MIND STATE – EP Review: “Rubber & Glue”

No MInd State EP

No Mind State is a very charismatic alternative rock band from Oslo, Norway, and they’re thrilled to release their debut EP Rubber & Glue, which drops today. The EP features four brilliant tracks, including two I’ve previously reviewed on this blog: “Hold Me Back, I’m Leaving” and “Fodder of Galaxies.” The band plays high-energy melodic rock, bombarding our ears with thunderous riffs, heavy bass lines, and speaker-blowing percussion. Making all this great noise are Henrik Posèbo Sørebø (Guitar, lead vocals), Vetle Berthelsen (Lead Guitar), Vegard Tveito (Bass, backing vocals) and Christian Gathe (Drums).

No Mind State 4

The title track “Rubber & Glue” is a fantastic hard-driving rock song about deceit and betrayal: “And I know you lied, ’cause your pants are on fire.” Stabbing riffs of fuzzy guitars interplay with a throbbing bass line and thunderous drumbeats. I love Henrik’s charming Norwegian accent that shines through in his raw, impassioned vocals.

Hold Me Back, I’m Leaving” is an exciting track, and their very first single. Henrik and Vetle lay down energetic riffs of gritty guitars over Vegard’s driving bass line, while Christian forcefully pummels the beat on his drum kit. Henrik’s sultry vocals explode into aggressive wails as he sings the lyrics about knowing you should get out of a dysfunctional relationship, but not being able to escape.

Up In The Air” is a beautiful rock song, and perhaps the most melodic of the four tracks. The guitar work is exquisite, and the riff that begins in the bridge and continues through the song’s end is absolutely breathtaking.

The magnificent “Fodder of Galaxies” starts off with sounds transmitted by a space station, then a gradual building of synths accompanied by a jangly guitar riff, humming bass, thumping drums and crashing cymbals. The biting lyrics speak to the evils of capitalism and greed, and the damage it’s doing to society and our earth:

What have we done
We’ve reaped all that we’ve sown
Still we crave for more
Galaxy dust is what we’ll swallow next just to quench our lust
Kill it faster – Grow more after
Villainous grab it – Hold it, Suffrage – Boring
Give me more
How can you say, that your way’s any better?
How can you know that we’re not just the fodder of Galaxies in my mind

Rubber & Glue is a great little EP, and I love this band. They’re currently working on their first full-length album, and I’m eager to hear more great songs from these talented musicians.

Connect with No Mind State: WebsiteFacebook / Twitter / Instagram
Stream their music on Spotify or Apple Music
Purchase on iTunes or Deezer

GEORGIA FEARN – Album Review: “Perfect on Paper”

Georgia Fearn pic

Having no musical talents whatsoever, I’m always impressed by people who do, and especially when they’re also quite young. Needless to say, I was blown away when I listened to the debut album Perfect on Paper by Welsh artist Georgia Fearn. Only 17 years old, the singer/songwriter from Carmarthen has a remarkable artistry and maturity far beyond her years. She writes all her own songs and plays guitar and piano, with session musicians playing the other instruments.

Released in March through Grapefruit Records, Perfect on Paper sounds like the work of a seasoned artist, which is actually the case in a sense. Georgia began writing songs at the age of nine, and at 17 she’s an accomplished wordsmith, penning thoughtful and frank lyrics about the joy, pain and complications that arise when we enter into relationships. She’s already performed in many different venues, most notably the famous Cavern in Liverpool, and her songs have received airplay on BBC Wales, and other radio stations in the UK.

Georgia incorporates a myriad of music styles, including pop, rock, jazz, hip hop and even Celtic folk, to create songs that are surprising, unique and always compelling. The superb opening track “L’Amour” beautifully illustrates what I’m talking about. The song features all sorts of interesting sounds and instruments like accordion, banjo, horns and strings, and the result is delightfully saucy track with a sophisticated French vibe. As if all that weren’t enough, she injects a bit of a Celtic feel in the chorus interlude. Didn’t I say that she likes to surprise us?

The lyrics describe a relationship doomed from the start: “You told me you were leaving ’cause I smoked too many cigarettes. I broke the bad habit, and I drove straight to your address. I saw you pressing your lips to someone new. It’s time to break my other bad habit. You.” Bloody brilliant.

Perfect on Paper is an ambitious work with 12 tracks, all of them suberb. “Catch Me If You Can” is an infectiously catchy number that had me humming the melody long after hearing the song. “Misty Mae” was inspired by a character in the TV series American Horror Story. A beautiful mandolin riff and flute lend a bit of a gypsy flair to the rousing track, while distorted electric guitar adds an edgy feel. “Does It Make You Wonder” is a sweeping ballad featuring a haunting piano riff, mournful violins and a military drumbeat. Georgia’s heartfelt vocals are extraordinary as she croons: “I’m living in a glass house, where the person I used to be, she’s buried six feet under. She’s trying to scream. She’s blocked out by the thunder. Does it ever make you wonder, what could have been?

“Sharp Objects” is a dark rock song about the proverbial town without pity. The track opens with what sounds like helicopter blades and men shouting in the distance. Georgia snarls the biting lyrics about hypocrisy and evil that lie beneath a rosy exterior: “Home is where the lies are. Pretty quiet village, that’s where all the scars are. Tiny little village, that’s where all the hate is. / Ooh I’m gonna drown. Something about this nuclear town. Toxic.

And speaking of dark, one of my favorites is the dramatic, searing title track “Perfect on Paper,” about a woman serving prison time for killing the man that done her wrong: “I know he never loved me. He just loved the thought. He thought there was a girl out there who’d do what he wants. She’d smile in a loving manner to her man perfect on paper. Not knowing soon she’d see every awful heartbreaking, sickening, ugly thing he could be.” Wow, those are some of the best lyrics I’ve seen in a while!

Another great track is the bluesy “Master of Jazz.” The sensuous song speaks of the cool allure of a jazz musician who can sweep a girl off her feet: “Heart on his sleeve and mic in his hand. I heard he was a part of some out of town band. He liked to think he was the king of swing. And the king of swing would have you hanging by a string He’s a master of jazz, when he sings you come alive.” The melancholy “Emptiness” is a piano-driven track with mournful violin. The lyrics address the feelings of pain and loss when love has gone: “We judge people for judging, ’cause judging is wrong. The only way to stay OK is writing a song. Food has lost it’s taste. Get me out of this place. If you cut me open, I would bleed his name. It hurts so much.

Georgia injects a hip hop beat and lots of distorted guitar into “No Need to Hide,” while “Always Be Yours” is a lovely, uplifting ballad about how she was saved by another’s love and devotion. The Latin-infused album closer “You Wouldn’t Do This if You Did” is a kiss-off to a lover with a chronic drinking problem: “How am I supposed to love you, when you only see me through bottled eyes. And every time I smell the liquor, a little part inside of me dies. You’re not who you were when I first met you. / I know you don’t love me. Cause you wouldn’t do this if you did.”

Perfect on Paper is a brilliant album, and an outstanding debut from this gifted and promising young artist. I expect – and hope – we’ll be hearing more great music from Georgia Fearn before long.

Connect with Georgia:  Facebook / Twitter
Stream her music:  Spotify / Apple Music
Purchase on iTunesAmazon / Klicktrack