DUDERAMA – Album Review: “New Views:

Duderama is the instrumental music project of Melbourne, Australia-based Liam Stack and Pierce Brown. The two met in the 1990s while both part of the alt-rock music scene in the capital city of Canberra, and played together in the alt-rock band Narco Wendy and lounge-rock act Coocoo Fondoo. Their collaboration as Duderama began in 2015 when Pierce was living in Melbourne and Liam in Ethiopia. Back in those days, the two created their musical collaborations remotely through phone apps and compressed files that, in their words, “were barely able to squeeze their way through the intermittent (or non-existent) internet of the authoritarian regime at the time.”

Their first release, in July 2015, was the EP The Mask, followed by a couple of double singles and their debut album Peace Fire that November. The duo continued with their prolific music output over the next two years, releasing four more albums by the end of 2017, as well as a couple more double singles and an EP, just for good measure. In July 2019 they released their excellent sixth album Quiet Life, and on January 22nd, they returned with their latest album New View, which they describe as “an elixir for these dark and strange times, where deftly executed and inventive guitar rock interplay can provide a simple joy amidst an era of mass anxiety. A lesson in the joyousness of lo-fi indie rock made with passion.” The guys’ skills for remote collaboration came in handy once again, as the album was recorded and produced during the Covid-19 lockdown. Liam mastered the album, while Pierce designed the art work.

New View features 11 guitar-driven instrumental tracks drawing upon numerous elements of rock, including alternative, progressive, grunge, electronic, psychedelic, and experimental, as well as jazz and funk. They kick things off with “Progtronic Man“, a moody lo-fi track dominated by a super-gnarly droning guitar riff and pulsating bass, punctuated here and there with more melodic guitar notes that add a bit of color to the proceedings. “Deepening Sky” features a funky head-bopping bass line overlain with wonderful jazzy guitar notes, accompanied by the perfect amount of percussion that make it one of my favorites on the album.

The title track “New Views” has a greater sense of urgency, with heavier rhythms, more pronounced synths, and multiple guitar textures, all blending to create palpable tension while still keeping things on an optimistic note. The mood shifts with “No Looking” to a languid, dreamy vibe that conjures up images of a romantic interlude on a sun-drenched tropical island. The warm synths and mix of shimmery and gnarly guitars are all exquisite. “Collapse Away” picks up the pace with an irresistible thumping groove that had me doing a lap dance on my chair! This song has it all: a terrific funky bass line, dynamic percussion, glittery atmospheric synths, and superb intricate guitar work. And speaking of superb guitars, the interplay between the guys’ shimmery and grungy guitars on “Entanglement” is positively mind-blowing.

As it’s title suggests, “Space Yacht” features spacey synths and gnarly psychedelic guitars set to a mid-tempo groove. Those super-grungy, buzzing guitars are back on “Light of a Billion Suns“, heavy, meandering lo-fi track that still manages to sound hopeful, thanks to well-placed melodic guitar notes. “High Life” is a fascinating track, with sort of a low-key Nirvana-esque grunge vibe as its foundation (at least to my ears), and embellished with a mix of late 60s psychedelic guitar notes along with some progressive elements. “Hollow Point” is rather pretty and melodic, with more of the guys’ marvelous intertwining guitar work and some really nice piano keys adding warmth to the track.

The album closes on a high note with “Liquid Beret“, a wonderfully mesmerizing track that’s another of my favorites. I love that powerful walking bass line that gives the song its deep, pulsating groove, and at the risk of sounding like a broken record, once again I must gush about the brilliance of the guys’ intricate, multi-textured guitar work. I’m not even sure how to describe it, but that persistent undulating riff is fantastic.

I’ve written about many instrumental albums, a lot of them heavy on synthesized electronic music, which is perfectly fine as I really like that kind of music. But what I especially love about Duderama’s music is how they put their guitars front and center, then build the rest of the music around them. New Views is an outstanding and expertly-crafted work, filled with instrumentally-complex tracks that captivate and surprise with every listen.

Pierce also writes a terrific music blog The Press Music Reviews, so do check it out.

MOONLIGHT BROADCAST – Single Review: “Amoebas in Glass Houses”

Moonlight Broadcast is an alternative rock band hailing from beautiful Melbourne, Australia. Influenced by such greats as Crowded House, The National and Death Cab for Cutie, they write songs with memorable guitar-driven melodies and poignant lyrics about (in their own words) “the winding, bumpy road we’re all travelling on.” The band is comprised of Cameron (lead vocals), Adi (guitar), Craig (bass, backing vocals) and Ash (drums & mojo). They released their excellent debut EP A Cynic’s Guide to Dying Happy in February 2018 (you can read my review here), and after a two and a half year break, the guys are back at last with a terrific new single “Amoebas in Glass Houses“.

The song has a bouncy melody and lively mix of jangly guitars, humming bass and punchy drumbeats, creating a pleasing, upbeat vibe that contrasts with the rather depressing and brutally honest lyrics. Cameron says the song is basically about procrastination and living in a prison of one’s own making, not moving forward or achieving anything. The lyrics speak to turning inward and wanting to hide away from the world and just be left alone, yet something’s missing and you’re still feeling restless and unhappy as outside pressures build: “I’m floating around the lounge room, red-eyed and my cock in my hand / another Friday night and the walls are closing in / Cracks creeping up my window / I can’t stay here and I can’t go.”

Feelings of inadequacy and worthlessness are further compounded by seeing a beautiful and unattainable young starlett on TV: “Her physical beauty makes me want to curl up and die where I sit.” All these negative feelings have him pondering suicide as the only possible way out, though he doesn’t really want that: “There’s a tree I can see from my lounge room / limbs spread like an invitation late on Friday night and I probably need a friend.

“Amoebas in Glass Houses” is a great song, and I’m so glad Moonlight Broadcast have graced our ears with new music.

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MOONLIGHT BROADCAST – EP Review: “A Cynic’s Guide to Dying Happy”

Moonlight Broadcast EP

I’ve stated in previous posts that one of my favorite aspects of social media is learning about new musicians and bands, and another recent find is Moonlight Broadcast, a rock group from the fair city of Melbourne, Australia. They released their debut EP A Cynic’s Guide to Dying Happy back in February 2018, but I’m reviewing it today, as it’s a stellar work that’s highly deserving of peoples’ attention.

Now a four-piece, Moonlight Broadcast is comprised of Cameron (lead vocals), Adi (guitar), Craig (bass, backing vocals) and Ash (drums & mojo). Influenced by such greats as Crowded House, The National and Death Cab for Cutie, they write songs with memorable guitar-driven melodies and poignant lyrics about (in their own words) “the winding, bumpy road we’re all travelling on.”

The EP kicks off with “Breathe Easy,” and as we press play, our ears are greeted by an arresting jangly guitar riff that immediately grabs our attention. Once the rhythm section enters the mix, the song settles into a really pleasing soft-rock groove. Cameron has a fine singing voice, and his heartfelt vocals nicely convey his love and devotion for a partner who’s put up with his shit over the years, and still chose to stay by his side:

I will be, I will be yours
Until I, until I die of a coronary from poor lifestyle
I hope that, I hope before I go
I’ll give you some days that make it worth your while

All those dark roads I may have dragged us down
I’m surprised you’re still around
All those dark roads I know I dragged us down
I’m so glad you’re still around

Stay with me, stay with me now
So I can breathe again

The beautifully-filmed video shows the band performing the song on a beach, with the tide gradually encroaching and ultimately engulfing them at the end.

Next up is “Harm Min (Josie)“, a bittersweet song about finally ending a tempestuous relationship with a mercurial lover named Josie. The jangly guitar work is gorgeous, and Cameron’s fervent vocals express a sad but detached sense of resignation that they’re both better off apart.

As wonderful as the first two songs are, my favorite is the hauntingly beautiful ballad “Sorrow Pass Me By.” Gorgeous twangy guitars and a somber drumbeat create a stirring backdrop for Cameron’s emotionally-charged vocals as he laments about his string of bad fortune, hoping his life will make a turn for the better: “I’d like to be lighthearted or even optimistic. Might be more to life than just getting through. I’m asking for once, sorrow please pass me by. It seems like you have been there, breathing down my neck for a real long time.”

The guys serve up more of their signature jangly guitars and driving beats on “The Ballad of Cognitive Dissonance“, a rousing tune with some great harmonica that give it a Country-rock vibe. The lyrics speak to being in a destructive, co-dependent relationship, knowing it’s destined to fail but unable to get out of it: “We’re driving in the dark with no headlights. I think there’s someone in the back here with us. I’m like a moth and you’re a buzzing street light. I’ll break my head in against you, over and over. / Sometimes I stick to my guns. Other times I turn tail and run.

Square One” is another take on being stuck in an unhealthy, one-sided relationship where the other person keeps a firm hold on your emotional attachment, making it impossible for you to let go: “It costs too much of me to keep you outside. I open the door and now I find, we’re back to square one. Your voice dancing through my brain, and I come undone. / It’s not so simple. It all hurts more than it should./ I will always be your alibi.” Musically, the song opens with a pensive, reverb-heavy guitar note, then settles into a slow, bass-driven tempo. The music gradually builds with more guitars, keyboards and heavier percussion, as Cameron passionately refrains “It’s all or nothing!” The guitar work is fantastic, and I love the extended run that continues straight through to the end, reminiscent of the great O.A.R. song “Shattered”.

A Cynic’s Guide to Dying Happy is a solid debut effort by Moonlight Broadcast. Every track is high quality, and the instrumentation, vocals and production values are all first-rate. These guys need to get busy recording some new songs ASAP, because we need their music in our lives!

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